5 Makeup Tips for Your Job Interview And A Resume Photo

You’re applying for jobs left and right. You’ve started getting invitations to interviews, and you’ve been editing your resume for what feels like forever. You’ve even booked a photo shoot for headshots to go with your resume, in case specific companies request them. You’ve got outfits picked out for interviews and the shoot, and now it’s time to consider interview appropriate makeup looks and makeup tips for job interview. Below are some of the makeup tips suggest by Resumes to You, a career expert and a skilful team who specialises in optimising resumes to help you get hired.

Each type of makeup will look a little different for interviews versus photos. This article will walk you through how you can impress a recruiter a little more with an appropriate makeup.

1. Primer

For interviews and photos alike, start by priming your face with foundation and powder however you normally would. Taking the time to set up a base will help the rest of your makeup last as long as it needs to. Not to mention, keeping this part of your normal routine consistent will provide you with some normalcy and confidence.

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2. Eyes

There are several components to eyes, including shadow, liner, and mascara.

Shadow

Shadow for an interview should be as neutral as possible. You want to do nothing except emphasising your natural features so that the interviewer sees as much “you” as possible. A slight shimmer is acceptable, but anything with bold colour or glitter is inappropriate for this particular occasion. Save the fun shadows for a night out. Photos require a slightly darker shadow at the crease to define eyes a little more. The lighting involved in the photo shoot will naturally wash you out slightly, so the definition is your friend. With that said, stay away from black and extremely dark browns. A mix of beiges, browns, and taupes should do the trick.

Liner

Rather than a matte black, winged, liquid liner for your interview, consider using an angle brush to edge shadow into upper and lower lashes, about two-thirds of the way across the eye, starting at the outer corner. Using shadow as liner creates a softer, subtler effect and provides definition without overpowering. Try the same trick for the photos, except with black shadow rather than brown.

Mascara

Apply mascara as you normally would. Don’t be afraid of combing out any clumps so that lashes appear as natural as possible. Again, you’re emphasizing what’s there rather than creating something new.

3. Cheeks

Pick a blush colour that goes with your skin tone, even if it looks a little bright in the container. Rather than picking a more neutral colour, use less than you normally would of the brighter shade. By limiting the amount you put on your face, you’ll achieve a balanced look without sacrificing any of the tones. Blush application will be roughly the same for photos and interviews. For the photos, consider brushing a bit of bronzer over cheekbones, on top of blush. A bit of shimmer will set the photos off nicely.

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4. Lips

Choose a neutral lip gloss or lipstick for the interview. Something with a bit of shimmer will hide any chafing on lips. When in doubt about colour, stick with clear. Photos require a little more colour on lips. Something in the pink family is typically best. Choose a tone that compliments the undertones in your skin.

5. Finishing spray

After taking the time to make yourself up so carefully, set the look with finishing spray so that it lasts throughout the interview or shoot.

With these tips, interviews and resume photos will be a breeze. Simply remember that you’re highlighting all of the beauty and capability that you already have when you consider how to look professional for a job interview. The best makeup for job interview simply emphasizes your light.

Read Also: Doing Your Own Makeup Before a Model Shoot

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